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Sirolimus

Some of you may know that there have been trials on the drug, Sirolimus, which is given intravitreally or subconjunctivally (i.e. into the eye).

The idea behind this medication is that it should allow us to decrease our use of steroids which have such horrible side-effects, and it tends not to give so many other side effects, and it is not taken systemically (i.e. into our bodies). Continue reading

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Qingkailing

Qingkailing is a chinese medicine formula which has been used for cerebrovascular diseases and some inflammatory diseases including uveitis.    At one stage, about five years ago, there was some work in the US looking at the possibilities of using this for uveitis.  It is given as an injection and has a number of ingredients including some traditional roots and flowers.

There has been a recent trial at Shandong University of Traditional Medicine Eye Hospital where qingkailing was injected into rats with autoimmune uveitis (Birdshot is an autoimmune uveitis).  It was found that it could offer immunomodulatory effects.

If this is the case (it will need to be trialled on people too), it could be a possible alternative to the rather toxic systemic medications we currently have to take.

Read the full story at

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23123470

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Helminth (worms) Infections

The Institute of Immunology and Infection Research at University of Edinburgh has published a paper on Helminth (worm) infections and host immune regulation.  It looks at countries and areas where helminth parasites are endemic (i.e. many people carry these worms all their lives) and note that in these countries, there is a very low incidence of autoimmune diseases and allergies.  This suggests that the helminth parasites may protect against your immune system becoming disregulated.

The paper points out that there is now much interest in investigating helminths as a therapy, in both laboratory models and in human trials.  They believe that understanding and exploiting the way these parasites work are likely to highlight new strategies to control both infectious and immunological diseases.

See the full text at:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23034321?dopt=Citation